Judge claims Schapelle Corby’s ‘bad attitude’ towards Indonesia made it difficult to spare Bali9 duo Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran from execution

Judge claims Schapelle Corby’s ‘bad attitude’ towards Indonesia made it difficult to spare Bali9 duo Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran from execution

Judge claims Schapelle Corby’s ‘bad attitude’ towards Indonesia made it difficult to spare Bali Nine duo Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran from execution

-Former Indonesian chief judge Jimly Asshiddiqie was part of anti-death penalty campaign for Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran
-He says Schapelle Corby made it harder to spare drug smuggler’s lives
-Corby showed a lack of thanks when she was released from jail last year
-He said her attitude towards Indonesia created bad impression for local

Schapelle Corby made it difficult to save fellow Australian drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran from death row because of her bad attitude towards Indonesia, a former judge says.

Former chief of Indonesia’s constitutional court, Jimly Asshiddiqie, said Corby’s lack of thanks when she was granted clemency and later released on parole made it harder to win support from the highest levels of government to spare Chan and Sukumaran’s lives, Fairfax Media reports.

The push for Chan and Sukumaran to be executed in April came directly from President Joko Widodo despite a push from the Australian government for clemency, according to Professor Asshiddiqie.

Schapelle Corby’s bad attitude made it difficult to save fellow Australian drug smugglers Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran from death row, according to former chief justice Jimly Asshiddiqie

‘(Former president) Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono once gave clemency to Corby, and… she still spoke very badly about Indonesia,’ he told told the newspaper.

‘She never showed her thanks, or expressed any thanks to Indonesia. This created a very bad impression among the Indonesian public.’

Corby’s release on parole from Bali’s Kerobokan Prison last year and her family’s reaction to being granted clemency in 2012 were among the negative factors that lead to an anti-death penalty campaign, which Prof Asshiddiqie was part of, failing for Chan and Sukumaran.

 

The push for Andrew Chan (right) and Myuran Sukumaran (left) to be executed in April came directly from President Joko Widodo despite a push from the Australian government for clemency


Corby, pictured with sister Mercedes and footballer Todd Carney in Bali after her release last year, never expressed any thanks towards Indonesia, according to Professor Asshiddiqie

Prof Asshiddiqie said Corby’s lack of thanks when she was granted clemency and later released on parole made it harder to win support from the highest levels of government to spare Chan and Sukumaran’s lives

Pressure mounted for Indonesia to re-arrest Corby after her sister Mercedes gave an interview to Channel Seven speculating that the 4.1kg of marijuana in the drug smuggler’s boogie board bag ‘could have been from Indonesia’.

Prof Asshiddiqie, who has since retired and now works at the University of Indonesia, said the President’s decision to go ahead with the executions of Chan and Sukumaran was widely applauded by people within his country.

He was in Melbourne on Tuesday to give a lecture at Melbourne University about Islam, democracy and the death penalty in the future.

Pressure mounted for Indonesia to re-arrest Corby after her sister Mercedes gave a media interview when she was released speculating that the drugs were planted in her boogie board bag by Indonesia

source : Daily Mail

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